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Monday, 17 December 2018 00:00

Pregnancy Foot Pain

When a woman discovers she is pregnant, there are many changes that normally take place over the next nine months and thereafter. Experiencing foot pain during pregnancy is common, and this can produce discomfort while standing. Swelling may accompany foot pain, which may make it difficult to perform daily tasks. There may be several reasons why foot pain may be apparent during pregnancy, including extra pressure the feet must endure from the additional weight gain, a natural change in posture as a result of the center of gravity shifting in the body, in addition to the blood becoming thicker, possibly causing uncomfortable foot cramps. There may be gentle exercises that can be performed, which may provide the desired relief from pregnancy foot pain. Additionally, drinking plenty of fresh water, limiting salt intake, and eating a balanced diet may aid in the reduction of foot pain that is associated with pregnancy. If you would like additional information about techniques that may avoid foot pain during this time in your life, it is advised to speak with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What foot problems can arise during pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy, but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How can I keep my feet healthy during pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women
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Monday, 10 December 2018 00:00

What Is the Definition of Plantar Fasciitis?

There is a portion of tissue that is located on the bottom of the foot, which is referred to as the plantar fascia. The purpose of this tissue is to connect the heel bone to the toes. Severe pain and discomfort may develop in the heel area if the plantar fascia becomes inflamed. It may feel worse in the morning upon arising, and the pain may gradually diminish as the day progresses. This condition is known as plantar fasciitis, and there may be several reasons why this ailment may develop. Common causes may include being obese, which may exert excess weight on the heels, wearing shoes that fit incorrectly, in addition to standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time. Research has shown there may be gentle stretches that can be performed, which may bring temporary desired relief. If you suspect you may have this uncomfortable condition, it is advised to seek the counsel of a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can perform a correct diagnosis and proper treatment techniques can begin.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Todd Goldberg  from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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Monday, 03 December 2018 00:00

Three Areas of Peripheral Neuropathy

Patients who are afflicted with peripheral neuropathy are typically familiar with a tingling sensation or numbness in their feet that generally accompanies this uncomfortable condition. Additional symptoms may include difficulty in walking, feeling a stabbing pain that may be in the feet, or experiencing muscle weakness. Research has shown the peripheral nerves are categorized into three areas. One group is known as the motor nerves and will affect performing activities that may include walking or picking up an object. Additionally, sensory nerves affect the ability to differentiate between hot and cold, or objects that are smooth or rough. Finally, autonomic nerves control specific functions of the body, which may include digestion, heart rate, and blood pressure. If you are experiencing symptoms in the feet that may indicate neuropathy, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist, so a proper diagnosis can be performed.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be trigged by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy, whether it be diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, or others, will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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