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July 2020


Morton’s neuroma is a condition that affects the ball of your foot. Over time the sheath surrounding the nerve becomes irritated or inflamed and forms a thickened scar tissue. The most common site of pain is between the third and fourth toes. Pain from this condition is often described as, feeling like a pebble is in your shoe and you keep stepping on it. The pain may be sharp, or you may feel a burning sensation or numbness. People who wear high heels, run regularly, or who have other foot deformities such as hammertoe, bunions, or flat feet are at an increased risk of developing Morton’s neuroma. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist, who can diagnose and treat your problem.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Todd Goldberg of Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

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Many pregnant women experience swollen feet. It often occurs in the later stages of pregnancy, and can be uncomfortable. This can be a result of the pressure the growing fetus can inflict on the veins in the feet and legs. Additionally, circulation in the body may become slower, and this may contribute to water retention. Research has indicated that swelling may be reduced when sodium intake is decreased, and plenty of fresh water is consumed daily. It is beneficial to avoid standing for extended periods of time throughout the day, and performing specific foot stretches may help to improve circulation. For more information about how to alleviate swollen feet during pregnancy, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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The bones that are located in the center of the foot are referred to as the metatarsal bones. They connect the heel and arch to the toes and can be prone to stress fractures. This is a common injury among runners that occurs as a result of repetitive motions. Stress fractures may be minimized when proper warm-ups are performed, as this may help to reduce pressure on the foot bones. An early symptom of a stress fracture is pain in the foot that may diminish when the affected foot is rested. It is suggested to cease the activity that caused the injury. Additional symptoms can include extreme tenderness, swelling, and difficulty walking. It is beneficial to wear shoes that fit correctly, in addition to replacing them approximately every three hundred miles. If you would like more information about stress fractures of the feet and how to prevent them, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 06 July 2020 00:00

Location of Pain From Cuboid Syndrome

Pain and discomfort that exists from cuboid syndrome is generally felt on the outer edge of the foot, which is the same  side of your little toe. The cuboid bone is one of several small bones located in each foot, and may become dislocated from overuse, or from frequently participating in running and jumping activities. Since it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint exactly where pain is coming from, this condition is often misdiagnosed or confused with a stress fracture. When a proper evaluation is performed, the correct treatment can begin. If you are experiencing pain around the middle of the foot, or at the base of the fourth and fifth toes, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can guide you toward effectively treating this condition.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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