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Littlestown, PA

 (717) 359-5300

Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Varicose veins are visibly raised and swollen blood vessels beneath the surface of the skin. They are frequently seen on the lower legs, where they can be recognized by their blue, purple, or red coloration. Varicose veins are often a cosmetic concern, but they can also become itchy and painful. They are most common in women, older people, and those who are obese. Varicose veins are caused by a malfunction in the one-way valves in the veins that prevent blood from flowing backwards. Weakness or damage to the valves causes blood to pool in the veins. The pooled blood raises the venous pressure and makes the veins swell and twist. If you have varicose veins in your lower legs that are painful, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist for diagnosis and a treatment plan. 

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Todd Goldberg of Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Saturday, 15 January 2022 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

The plantar fascia is a ligament that runs along the bottom of your foot, connecting the heel bone to the toes. This strong ligament supports the arch of the foot, providing it with strength, stability, and shock absorption as you go about your day. Stretching the plantar fascia can help keep it strong, flexible, and healthy, preventing debilitating injuries and foot pain. Stretching is also helpful if you are recovering from a plantar fascia injury. One simple stretch that you can do is a towel scrunch. Sit in a chair and place a towel flat on the floor in front of you. Using just your toes, scrunch up the towel, pulling it towards you. For more information about the benefits of stretching the plantar fascia, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stretching Your Feet
Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

Flat feet are a type of foot structure in which the arch, usually located in the middle of the sole of the foot, is absent or is only visible when the foot is not bearing weight. Some people are born with flat feet. Others have an arch that has collapsed over time. The latter are more prone to foot pain. When diagnosing flat feet, your podiatrist will examine the feet closely while you sit or stand and hold your foot in various positions. They may also look at the insides of your shoes. People with flat feet often have more wear on the inside of the sole. For more information about flat feet, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Todd Goldberg from Complete Family Foot Care Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Littlestown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is Flexible Flat Foot?
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